Hype About CBD Oil Use in Pets

In recent months more questions are being asked about using Cannabidiol (CBD) oil in pets for different aliments. I want to start by defining these substances to avoid confusion for pet owners. The two plants that are being grown are called cannabis(marijuana) and hemp. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the hallucinogenic property that differentiates between these two plants. If the plant has more than 0.3% THC in it, that plant is considered cannabis(marijuana) and is illegal in Iowa. If that plant has less than 0.3% THC it is considered hemp. Hemp oil comes from the seeds of the hemp plant. The hemp oil has been called a superfood and has a nutty flavor. It has been used in cooking, soaps, and lotions. CBD oil comes from the flowers, leaves, and stem of the hemp plant. CBD oil is used for its medicinal properties. The current Iowa law allows for medical use of CBD oil for certain aliments in humans but not in animals.

These oils are considered supplements not prescriptions. CBD oils made from hemp and containing less than .3% THC will not have any mind altering effects. The source you get your supplement from must be researched since some products contain “whole hemp extract” not CBD oil. Those products may not contain any CBD oil at all and be completely legal to sell to consumers. We all have heard how unregulated the human supplement market is and these hemp products are no different. BUYER BE AWARE.

In 2018, President Trump signed the Farm Bill into law that legalized cultivating and producing industrial hemp containing less than 0.3% THC at institutions of higher learning and State Departments of Agriculture. Since it is legal at the federal level each state must now decide what its regulations will be and how and when to enforce those laws. With this bill in place more research can be done on the health and wellness benefits of these hemp plants. As veterinarians we look forward to the day when we are given clear details on our right and responsibility of prescribing and dispensing these products. Until that day we can discuss the potential benefits being seen within the pet industry, but in Iowa we are not allowed to sell or prescribe the CBD oils.

All mammals have an endocannabinoid system (ECS) with receptors built in to interact with cannabinoids naturally produced by the brain but also those derived from plants. When the CBD oils are supplemented to dogs and cats one can see benefits such as:

DOGS

  • Pain Killer
  • Anti-cancer Effects
  • Antiemetic

CATS

  • Appetite Stimulation
  • GI Tract Issues
  • Asthma

BOTH

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anticonvulsant
  • Anxiety/stress reliever

Looking at this list one would get the impression that this plant may fix all our pets health issues. This is far from the truth but it certainly indicates that once regulations are removed we may be seeing a steady increase in the use of CBD oil supplements by pet owners. Some veterinarians within the USA are already using these products in a large number of health conditions and I know CBD oils will eventually be encouraged in daily practice. Since there are still legal hurdles in all states around the use of these products you must stay tuned as we continue to learn more about these products in the human and animal markets.

I spoke with a representative at the Iowa Veterinary Medical Association (IVMA) about prescribing CBD oils. He indicated that the use of CBD oils in all 50 states is illegal in animals at this time. Whether a seller or prescriber of CBD oils is prosecuted is currently a gray zone. At Winterset Veterinary Center we have chosen to wait until more direction is given on the use of the CBD oils in private practice. For each of the above named benefits there are numerous other traditional treatments available to cure or relieve pain and suffering in our patients. We will continue to monitor developments on this hot topic and will keep you informed. Our main concern is the health of our patients and safety of all products that are recommended or prescribed. If you would like more information about this topic feel free to contact me for the information that I received from the IVMA. We welcome your thoughts and comments about this blog or any others that you may have an interest in.

Technology and Veterinary Medicine

In 1988 when I graduated from ISU College of Veterinary Medicine, I never knew how much change would occur in the area of technology. Computers were not a household item. We had just started to see VCR’s in most homes. Cell phones were nonexistent and not even a figment of our imagination. Most classes were taught with a projector and class notes printed out and placed in a binder to study. We still purchased text books and carried them with us to classes. Post offices and home rotary phones were the primary way to communicate with family and friends. It seems like this was only yesterday but also amazing what advances we have seen in the last 30 years.

When considering technology, I feel we are far better off with many of the modern advances but also feel we have lost some of the common courtesies of the past. I would hate to write out all of my notes on a typewriter or place them on hand written cards. Invoices that calculate sales tax are quick and easy with our software. Ordering products online to restock our shelves allows us to see immediately if a product is unavailable. Having clients receive text messages or emails has been a great addition to our reminder system for our patients and their preventative health needs. To even consider returning to the ways of the past gets my head spinning knowing how difficult tasks would be without computers.

In the past few years, our continuing education sessions have started including discussions on how to get the most out of social media sites for a veterinary practice. These sessions are insightful and offer lots of ideas on how to attract more clients to Winterset Veterinary Center. This monthly blog was one of the ideas that was shared about 3 years ago. Having a presence on the web was important and necessary to continue to attract new business and retain the current business. Phone books were no longer a good place to advertise since everyone seems to be looking up phone numbers on the web or they have the number stored in their phone. Whoever would have thought that phone books would no longer be needed.

Here is where I start to have a little concern when it comes to technology and information. The number of times I see or talk with people that have already sought out information from “DR GOOGLE” raises my eyebrows. It leaves me wondering at what point a practice like Winterset Veterinary Center will no longer be standing because we have already seen Doctors of human medicine and veterinary medicine diagnosing cases through computer portals. This seems like a great way to reduce cost and allow anyone and everyone access to affordable care. Yet removing the opportunity to place hands on a patient to assess the physical findings removes a large part of our diagnostics. The physical exam is the most important part of our evaluation. It gives us the direction needed to start our diagnostics and come to a diagnosis. Without that exam we are just guessing at what might be the cause.

We are seeing more and more clients choosing to order products online. The difficulty with this is that dogs and cats change weight classes and environments so what products are needed to prevent diseases constantly changes. Just because a product was used last year does not make it the best product to use this year. Lifestyles of the pets are constantly evolving and so without the help of your veterinarian you may be missing some key elements in prevention and thereby cause exposure to diseases and parasites that you were not even aware existed. The number of products that are available to chose from can be confusing and misunderstood for many clients. These are all important things to consider prior to ordering online. We as veterinarians are wanting to keep your pets safe and protected from internal and external parasites with the best products available to date. These products are changing constantly so do yourself a favor and ask your veterinarian what would be best for your fur baby. Buy local and keep your pets protected with the newest and most effective products.

Social media sites have shown to be helpful when finding business that offer services you are in need of. We have a website and a Facebook page currently. It is always nice to see when someone likes our page, a picture, or a blog that has been posted. We can track the activity and see the demographics of who is visiting our sites. The challenge with these sites is when an unhappy client wants to trash a business by telling only their side of the story. In the past if someone had a concern, they took their issues right to the source and together found a way to resolve the conflict. Now it seems people want to air their differences on these sites and it becomes a place where everyone shares their grievances as well. The negatives of social media on the lives of individuals and businesses can be detrimental. Numerous times lives are destroyed or worse ended because of words on social media.

Maybe we need to think carefully about what we write on these sites. If we would not be willing to say these words directly to the business or person, then maybe we should not write them online. Maybe we should consider speaking directly about the problem to the business or person and as in the “good old” days come to a conclusion together on how to resolve the issue. We need to remember to be kind when dealing with people. Everyone has a story and things happening in their lives unknown to us. We need to treat others as we want to be treated. If we all could use more gentleness and kindness in our daily lives what a better world this would be.

We love to see the positive reviews that are left on our Facebook page. We hope that our posts offer some important information. We appreciate all the times people share the found dogs or dogs up for adoption so we can help find their Forever Families. We are grateful we can now text or email clients with reminders and results. All in all, technology has been a positive addition to Veterinary Medicine. Let’s try to remember that relationships are important and we want to continue to serve our clients and their furry friends for years to come. We cannot do that without seeing you come through our doors. The relationships we make with our clients and their pets is what makes our days at Winterset Veterinary Center worthwhile.

Dog Bite Prevention

National Dog Bite Prevention Week is April 7-13, 2019. Over 4.5 million people are bitten each year and over 800,000 of those bitten require medical care. Over 50% of the victims are children and a higher percentage of the kids being bitten are under the age of 4. Over 50% of the biting dogs belong to family or friends, and greater than 77% of the bites occur on the dog owner’s property. These statistics show why it is important to always be aware of your dogs interactions with adults and children in and around your home.

Some general rules to teach your children to help avoid dog bites are:

  1. Never go near an unfamiliar dog. If an owner is present ask permission to pet before reaching out to touch them. If they say no, respect that and walk away.
  2. Never place hands inside fences or kennels to pet dogs.
  3. Never run from dogs as this encourages the dogs to chase.
  4. Never play with a dog’s food or toys
  5. Never approach a dog if growling or showing its teeth. A child not trained to be aware of this may think the dog is smiling. We show our teeth when happy.
  6. Never scream around dogs since this can be an instinct to attack.
  7. Never startle dogs from their sleep. They can come out confused and bite out of instinct.  Wake them first with touch or calling their name.
  8. Never leave small children unattended with dogs. Many homes trust their dogs and do not worry about their dog with their child, but what if the unthinkable happens.
  9. Never touch dogs that are sick or injured. They may bite because of pain.
  10. Never approach a dog that seems fearful and is hiding or avoiding you.

Over 30 different breeds have caused human fatalities in the last 30 years. There are certain breeds that appear to be listed more frequently than others, but the take away is that any dog can be vicious. Large dogs are more likely to cause serious damage but small dogs seem to have a higher possibility of biting out of fear and anxiety. Here at Winterset Veterinary Center we see dogs of all sizes, ages, colors, and breeds. We always are cautious, even when an owner indicates their pet would never bite. Often times when a pet does attempt to bite during an exam the owners are completely shocked by this behavior. We often times are not surprised since we can pick up on body language that dogs offer up indicating they are not comfortable with a situation. A few simple things to take notice of are dogs licking their lips, yawning, looking away from the person they are avoiding, tail tucking, and ears pinned back are all signs that this dog is not comfortable in this situation. Not every dog will bite after showing these signs but the potential is there and either the dog should be left alone or it should be approached with caution.

If you are fearful of a dog that is approaching you, DO NOT RUN! Even if you are the fastest person on the track team the dog will pursue you. Chasing moving targets is an instinct that dogs act on. Screaming is also important to avoid since dogs often hear high pitched sounds and consider it a sign of weakness. A reason to be silenced and attacked. Why else are they relentless with that squeaky toy to the point of silencing it? Children have been taught since early ages that if they are on fire — they should stop, drop, and roll. Please teach your children—ICE, TREE, ROCK for dog bite prevention. It may save their life someday. Ice indicates to freeze in the presence of a strange dog. Tree encourages them to stand tall and not look directly at the dog’s eyes since that can be seen as a challenge. Rock is used when knocked to the ground by a dog and you curl up into a ball and protect the face and belly with your arms and legs. As difficult as it would be, you should try to tell your children not to scream as this encourages the dog to continue to attack.

Dogs bite for a large number of reasons. I could not possibly list all the situations that could potentially lead to aggression or biting. A couple of important things to remember is early socialization, in the first 14 weeks of the puppy’s life, it is critical to making your puppy comfortable with new situations and all ages of people. Dogs that miss this window of opportunity can learn new social skills but the challenges are much greater. Avoid rough play with your puppy where you are encouraging barking, growling, or nipping at people. If allowed to play rough with one person, they will consider this okay with all people from babies up to the elderly. Start training your puppy to sit, stay, come, down, etc., immediately. These basic commands teach the puppy they need to listen and respect you.

A responsible pet owner will have their pet spayed or neutered to avoid unwanted puppies. It has been shown that neutered pets are 3 times less likely to bite. Being responsible also means keeping this pet for its entire lifetime which can be 15-20 years. Unfortunately, I have seen far too many owners give up their pets when they find them to be no longer desirable. Taking your pet to see the veterinarian for preventive care and seek out a training program that can help your dog live out its natural instincts. Exercise your pet daily so they can feel exhausted at the end of the day.

The late Dr. Sophia Yin has a poster about kids and pets. Follow this link How Kids and Pets Should Not Interact and get your free copy of this poster and share with your kids or students. Maybe if we spread this information, we will see the number of dog bites annually decline. Dogs are the most popular pet in households within the United States. Let’s work to make them the safest pet to have in our homes by being responsible pet owners and educating our friends and families about dog bite prevention.

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